Paediatric Disorders

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Overview

Pediatric diseases are the diseases which will effect at time of childhood. Some of the pediatric diseases include anemia, asthma, chickenpox, diphtheria, leukemia, measles, mumps, pneumonia, polio, tuberculosis, whooping cough, Lyme disease, fever, down's syndrome, dental caries, cystic fibrosis, chagas disease, candidiasis, cancer, bronchiolitis.

1. Sore Throat

  • Sore throats are common in children and can be painful. However, a sore throat that is caused by a virus does not need antibiotics. In those cases, no specific medicine is required, and your child should get better in seven to ten days. In other cases, a sore throat could be caused by an infection called streptococcal (strep throat).
  • Strep cannot be accurately diagnosed by simply looking at the throattest or in-office rapid strep test, which includes a quick swab of the throat, is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of strep. If positive for strep, your pediatrician will prescribe an antibiotic. It's very important that your child take the antibiotic for the full course, as prescribed, even if the symptoms get better or go away. Steroid medicines (such as prednisone) are not an appropriate treatment for most cases of sore throat.

2. Ear Pain

  • Ear pain is common in children and can have many causesincluding ear infection (otitis media), swimmer's ear (infection of the skin in the ear canal), pressure from a cold or sinus infection, teeth pain radiating up the jaw to the ear, and others. . To tell the difference, your pediatrician will need to examine your child's ear. In fact, an in-office exam is still the best way for your pediatrician to make an accurate diagnosis. If your child's ear pain is accompanied by a high fever, involves both ears, or if your child has other signs of illness, your pediatrician may decide that an antibiotic is the best treatment.
  • Amoxicillin is the preferred antibiotic for middle ear infectionsexcept when there is an allergy to penicillin or chronic or recurrent infections.

3. Urinary Tract Infection

  • Bladder infections, also called urinary tract infections or UTIs, occur when ¬≠bacteria build up in the urinary tract. A UTI can be found in children from infancy through the teen years and into adulthood. Symptoms of a UTI include pain or burning during urination, the need to urinate frequently or urgently, bedwetting or accidents by a child who knows to use the toilet, abdominal pain, or side or back pain.

4. Skin Infection

  • In most children with skin infections, a skin test (culture or swab) may be needed to determine the most-appropriate treatment. Tell your doctor if your child has a history of MRSA, staph infection, or other resistant bacteria or if he or she has been exposed to other family members or contacts with resistant bacteria.